Messy Color™ Kniphofia Ltd Run

511225 -

Kniphofia Ltd Run (511225)<br />An opal orange.

An opal orange.




"Marmalade [left] and Kniphofia [right- named for the red hot poker plant, in case you missed the reference]. Both are absolutely brilliant, delicious, transparent oranges. I did find that the Marmalade took a little more effort to strike, and you might argue that it is a little toasty in colour. Overall though I think any colour difference between them, at least the way I use them, is very very subtle. Both are a delicious splash of transparent orangey goodness." Read more at DragonJools blog. – Dwyn Tomlinson

Click here for other interesting Kniphofia Ltd Run discoveries.

 
CiM Orange-zilla for the body with enamels. Fins are made from CiM Kniphofia.
Heather Sellers
CiM Kniphofia
Hillary Lawson
CiM Kniphofia
Dwyn Tomlinson
CiM Kniphofia
Laurie Nessel
CiM Kniphofia
Joy Munshower
CiM Kniphofia
Regis Teixera

CiM Tester Feedback

  • Special thanks to Claudia Eidenbenz for the photos in this section.

Join Trudi Doherty's FB group Lampwork Colour Resource Sharing Information for a catalogue of color study.
Claudia Eidenbenz’s "Vetrothek" (glass library) is a great resource for color comparisons.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.
Consult Jolene Wolfe's glass testing resource page.


Kniphofia with DH Clio.
Chris Haussler
"Kniphofia is a medium orange transparent that is a bit slower to strike than other transparent oranges, but apart from that and the fact that it does not seem to opacify the way Clockwork does, it's very similar to Clockwork. It seems not so slow to strike as Goldfish was last year so it doesn't have quite as much range as that colour did. It is a gorgeous colour, though, and I appreciate both the flexibility of hue and how this colour seems to stay more transparent when fully struck." Read more at Melanie's blog.
Melanie Graham
"Love Kniphofia- this juicy orange holds its color on white."
Suzanne Cancilla-Fox
"Kniphofia is an electric orange transparent. Shown here encasing white, with Effetre dark sky blue dots [love the reaction!], and as spacers. Encase with DH Clio for that elusive hot pink."
Janet Evans
"Kniphofia, Marmalade and Orange-zilla are all reactive to silver glass [which is typical for orange glass] and the silver glass if melted flat will turn a bluish grey without a clear layer between the orange glass and silver glass. All three will also do the pink thing with certain Double Helix glass if there is a layer of clear between the orange glass and silver glass."
Terri Herron
"The color of orange soda pop! What a great color. Easy to work with. Beautiful on its own or encased over clear. I made a simple spacer bead. I also made a second bead with a base of Effetre Super Clear. The left side was then encased in Effetre white to represent the opaque, the middle in CiM Marshmallow to represent the translucent, and finally the right remained clear to represent the transparent. Kniphofia was then wound onto this bead. This gives the opportunity to see encasement in a variety of common beadmaking situations."
Kim Fields
"So when I tested this glass my main goal was to see if I could keep it transparent. I discovered with Goldfish that if I heated it until the glass was totally clear [no wispies anywhere in the glass and it looks like you have burned the color out] you get a beautiful juicy clear orange as a result ... and Kniphofia is exactly the same! I actually ignore the glass completely as I work it and it magically strikes on its own while I am adding other elements of decoration. [Something that I've never EVER experienced with any Effetre transparent orange!] With Kniphofia, like Goldfish, I like to place a clear core under a layer of the color before encasing to lighten the saturation of the orange. I get a juicy darker saturated orange by itself and a smidge lighter when placed over a clear core. One side note- the little spacer bead here is Kniphofia by itself and I’ll be darned if it didn’t take me 15 minutes of flashing it in the upper flame to get it to strike. Never had that happen before! Also this orange does react with turquoise resulting in the 'black line' reaction."
Angela Dose
"Kniphofia is a bright opal orange glass that was easy to strike and juicy in depth of color. Working from left to right, the beads were created as:
- a short barrel bead with CiM clear core, a layer of Kniphofia and Double Helix Melia scrolls reduced to a metallic shine.
- the central barrel bead is a CiM clear core, a layer of Kniphofia and Double Helix Melia dots and endcaps reduced to a metallic shine.
- a square bead with a Kniphofia core, a wrap of 99% fine silver wire and encased in CiM clear glass. The silver has reacted to a blackened rustic look that some designers seek out. The spacers are pure Kniphofia.  
Similar reactions to silver are seen in these test beads, so layering with clear between orange and silver continues to ensure all stays true." Read more at Darlene's blog.
Darlene Collette
"These encased hearts are made with Kniphofia and Effetre 006 clear. It's a bright opal orange glass. Sometimes I find that opal colours can look quite dense, especially if they are heated and cooled several times. These encased hearts though look both opal and translucent. Sadly this photograph doesn't quite capture just how bright this colour is in real life!" Read more at Kitzbitz Art Glass' blog.
Jolene Wolfe
"Firecracker, Kniphofia, & Bing all get the beautiful pink with Clio."
Suzy Hannabuss
Left to right: Marmalade and Kniphofia. See more of Claudia's color comparisons.
Claudia Eidenbenz
Left to right: Ornela 9003 Hyacinth Mittel, Kniphofia, Lauscha 150 Opal Orange, & Reichenbach 605 Mystic Rot. See more of Claudia's color comparisons.
Claudia Eidenbenz
"Kniphofia is a beautiful orange and if it is meant to be a striking colour, wow it was very easy to strike and not shocky at all. Love it."
Suzy Hannabuss
"Kniphofia is a lovely bright true orange. Not shocky and no issues with bubbling or scumming. Played nicely with dichroic and silver glass on surface. I did not try to strike it since I was already putting so much stress on the bead with both dichroic and silver glass reduction."
Terri Herron
"Kniphofia [Latin name for the red hot poker plant] is a deep, rich, translucent orange. Kniphofia melts smoothly with no shocking and it’s got a nice working consistency. Like other transparent oranges, it does lose its colour as you work and it requires a level of striking to get it to return but fear not, it’s dead easy to strike; just use it and it’ll do the work for you. The photo shows a bead with its polka dots added, before I melted them down flat, and you can see that the colour of the Kniphofia is uneven. I didn’t do anything to rectify that except for melting in my polka dots [quite slowly because that’s how I work] and by the time I’d done so the Kniphofia was a uniform orange all over." Read more at Laura's blog.
Laura Sparling
"Kniphofia [a name I will never be able to remember] and Marmalade both worked up as transparent oranges for me. Harder for me to strike than Clockwork but definitely more transparent. The kitties struck no problem but the results were varied for the small spacer beads."
Lori Peterson
"Kniphofia is a very pretty transparent orange. The flowers are Rapunzel [an opaque pinky lilac], topped with Coming up Roses. All the colours behave well in the flame, no shockiness or bubbling. The orange colour was easy to strike back after initial melting and is beautifully transparent and bright."
Josephine Wadman
"Most transparent oranges [even opal ones] quickly take on a more dense opaque look, rather than than keeping transparent/translucent properties. But check these beauties out! The hearts while admittedly small beads did have several heating and cooling cycles while I made them ... but look they are very much translucent."
Trudi Doherty
"Marmalade [left] and Kniphofia [right- named for the red hot poker plant, in case you missed the reference]. Both are absolutely brilliant, delicious, transparent oranges. I did find that the Marmalade took a little more effort to strike, and you might argue that it is a little toasty in colour. Overall though I think any colour difference between them, at least the way I use them, is very very subtle. Both are a delicious splash of transparent orangey goodness." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson
"Kniphofia seems like a somewhat streaky version of Clockwork. It’s a beautiful color that can be used many ways. So far, I made a blown glass vessel with it and Effetre black. It was not shocky and was easy to blow and shape."
Susan Parry