Messy Color™ Orange-zilla Ltd Run

511226 -

Orange-zilla Ltd Run (511226)<br />A dense transparent orange.

A dense transparent orange.




"Orange-zilla is the most juiciest and richest of oranges. Beyond lush, with absolutely no working issues whatsoever. A definite new favourite." – Juliette Mullett

Click here for other interesting Orange-zilla Ltd Run discoveries.

 
CiM Orange-zilla
Alexis Berger
CiM Orange-zilla
Hillary Lawson
CiM Orange-zilla & Bird's Nest
Darlene Collette
CiM Orange-zilla
Joy Munshower

CiM Tester Feedback

  • Special thanks to Claudia Eidenbenz for the photo in this section.

Join Trudi Doherty's FB group Lampwork Colour Resource Sharing Information for a catalogue of color study.
Claudia Eidenbenz’s "Vetrothek" (glass library) is a great resource for color comparisons.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.
Consult Jolene Wolfe's glass testing resource page.


"Orange-zilla! CiM’s intensely dense, juicy, opaque orange practically vibrates with colour. I would call this the orange equivalent to Sangre. It works really well with DH Clio to produce that highly desirable hot pink effect. I found it easy to work and had no issues with shockiness. Shown here as a base bead encased by DH Clio and as spacers."
Janet Evans
"Orange-zilla is a very intense, bright, orange glass. It too lives up to its name in that it is a strong and powerful color. It was easy to sculpt and make basic beads with but I found it a bit challenging to blow into a vessel as the stiffness of this glass tended to resist the flowing and expansion of a bubble. It was not shocky poppy and I was impressed at how well it maintained its color-no burning or blackening- even during extended heating episodes. Just for fun and experimentation, I decided to encase a couple of Orange-zilla beads with Coming Up Roses. This gave the beads a warmth and depth that clear glass would not have afforded. When you hold the beads up into the light, the combination is quite magical."
Susan Parry
“I created a bead to test Orange-zilla in a layered silver glass bead. This flat tab bead was created by layering Double Helix Kalypso silver glass over a core of Orange-zilla with a clear glass encasement. It is important to ensure a thin layer of clear glass is placed between the 2 layers to protect the color of the core. I added copper foil dragonflies, reduced the silver glass and encased in Double Helix Zephyr. Creamy pinks and blues resulted with peeks of the juicy orange showing through.” See more at Darlene’s blog.
Darlene Collette
Check out Maria's YouTube review of Orange-zilla.
Maria Schoenenberger
"Orange-zilla is the most juiciest and richest of oranges. Beyond lush, with absolutely no working issues whatsoever. A definite new favourite."
Juliette Mullett
"Kniphofia, Marmalade and Orange-zilla are all reactive to silver glass [which is typical for orange glass] and the silver glass if melted flat will turn a bluish grey without a clear layer between the orange glass and silver glass. All three will also do the pink thing with certain Double Helix glass if there is a layer of clear between the orange glass and silver glass."
Terri Herron
"Orange-zilla is an extremely dense orange. On its own, it acts like an opaque. Brightens when used over white and a touch of transparency over clear. I made a simple spacer bead. I also made a second bead with a base of Effetre Super Clear. The left side was then encased in Effetre white to represent the opaque, the middle in CiM Marshmallow to represent the translucent, and finally the right remained clear to represent the transparent. Orange-zilla was then wound onto this bead. This gives the opportunity to see encasement in a variety of common beadmaking situations."
Kim Fields
"Orange-zilla is a great vibrant color that looks translucent on beads and brighter over white."
Suzanne Cancilla-Fox
"Orange-zilla is a yummy orange/red glass! My first impression out of the kiln is that it reminds me of Effetre’s carrot red. A little orange, a little red and not fussy at all for me. It encased well, didn’t shock or pit or get 'hot' spots if I over heated an area. I didn’t have to strike it, it just bloomed both encased and by itself. I’m loving this color! It doesn’t react with turquoise glass like some orange colors and give you that thin black line which makes me happy! In the image I also used a bit of Lingonberry on the large round."
Angela Dose
"Orange-zilla is the perfect orange for California poppies."
Anna Miller
"Zing! This bright orange is called Orange-zilla. It is described as a dense transparent orange on the CiM website. Both under encasement and as a solid colour bead it looks opaque to me though. Orange-zilla is pure sunshine in glass form. I wouldn't class Orange-zilla as a striking glass as it didn't lose its colour when first melted and so didn't require any cooling/heating cycles to bring the colour back." Read more at Kitzbitz Art Glass' blog.
Jolene Wolfe
Left to right: Kugler 150, Orange-zilla, Lauscha 150 Opal Orange, and Orange Crush. See more of Claudia's color comparisons.
Claudia Eidenbenz
"If Orange-zilla is considered a striking colour, it sure was easy to strike it and it is a very dense orange. In the pic you can see through to the chain but not with Orange-zilla. Also, not shocky at all."
Suzy Hannabuss
"Orange-zilla is a true orange. In bead form it appears more like an opaque to me. Not shocky and no issues with bubbling or scumming. Played nicely with dichroic and silver glass on the same bead! I would not consider it a striking orange."
Terri Herron
"Orange-zilla rocks my world. Intense tangerine orange which stayed pretty opaque for me. Wonderful color."
Lori Peterson
"Big, bold, almost opaque, juicy, juicy, orange." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson
"This color is a beautiful true orange. It really feels 50% between yellow and red it really reminds me of a carrot. It has quite a bit of translucency, but I would say quite a bit less than other translucent oranges released by CiM in the past. No shockiness or popping when being worked. Color stayed consistent throughout, no scumming or yellowing."
Alexis Berger