Messy Color™ Class M Planet Ltd Run

511540 -

Class M Planet Ltd Run (511540)<br />An opaque blue laden with silver.

An opaque blue laden with silver.




"In a more worked piece, you see this colour start to differentiate itself. A greenish blush has formed, apparently relative to cooling and heating." Read more at DragonJools blog. – Dwyn Tomlinson

Click here for other interesting Class M Planet Ltd Run discoveries.

 
Messy Class M Planet
Pati Walton
				Top left to right: bead encased with clear, non-encased bead, etched bead
Joy Munshower
Messy Class M Planet
Kandice Seeber
Messy Class M Planet
Gloria Sevey
Class M Planet
Claire Morris
Messy Class M Planet
Kim Fields

Messy Tester's Feedback

  • Class M Planet was mixed in response to requests for a "blue version" of Canyon de Chelly.

Visit the CiM Resource Page on the Kitbitz Art Glass site.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.


"Class M Planet exhibits an assortment of lovely tones including moody denim, soft French blue, and mossy green. Definitely on my 'must have' list." Read more at Heather's blog.
Heather Sellers
"Class M Planet is a shy glass, who will only show its different shades properly if worked in a very certain way. For me it is unlike some other silver-laden glasses that love heating hot, cooling and then striking, Class M Planet seems to not like being over worked, and to be worked quite cool with little changes in heat. It loves being spot heated and as dots under clear. I can imagine it could be useful in some raised stringerwork and bas-relief sculptural pieces like Canyon de Chelly. It was an easy glass to work with at the flame in terms of being easy to melt, not shocky and no bubbling issues."
Claire Morris
"For the most part, as I worked the glass in these beads, Class M Planet stayed a pretty lapis blue, sometimes fading to a teal-ish color here and there. But in the kiln, most of it went back to blue. This is especially true when heavily encased. The green shows up more when the color is 'naked' and raised. . . . Even though Class M Planet is a glass that contains a lot of silver, I didn't get any reaction when using a reduction flame." Read more at Kandice's blog.
Kandice Seeber
"In a more worked piece, you see this colour start to differentiate itself. A greenish blush has formed, apparently relative to cooling and heating." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson
"I made the beads by making a base of Class M Planet and allowing it to cool ever so slightly, which brings out a blue-green colour. I didn’t adjust my flame; the glass just gets this green bloom all on its own. I then wrapped a trail of clear around the bead and melted it flat, then I encased the whole bead with a thin layer of clear. I didn’t do anything else to the bead to get the green and blue colour variations; these happened on their own just by working the bead in a neutral flame. I’m pretty sure that the colours carried on developing during the kiln annealing process." Read more at Laura's tumblr.
Laura Sparling
"Class M Planet is an absolute stunner. It's a silver rich blue that is just so pretty. As you can see here it gives striations and lighter patches of blue in places." Read more at Kitzbitz Art Glass' blog.
Jolene Wolfe